Wednesday, 25 November 2009

Acceptances

I've had another short story acceptance, again with a bit of a wait, since it's for Mirror Dance's spring issue. It's for my piece 'Your Evil Horde Needs You'. I'll undoubtedly mention it again nearer the time.

An idea for what is potentially quite a funny novel has come to me, and I'll probably see what I can do with it, even though I've got one series up and running with DDP and the start of what could be another out to a couple of other publishers. I'm planning this as more of a one off anyway, though there's part of me that automatically starts thinking of all the other stories I could set in the same sort of world.

Continued joblessness has me contemplating trying my hand at freelancing. It's undoubtedly the worst possible time to start doing so, but it's one thing I hopefully have the skills to do, and might help me pay off a few of the more urgent debts. I briefly looked into it a couple of years ago, before wandering off to write silly novels.

Universities seem to be experiencing a trend towards modern and early modern history. I'm not entirely sure why. The Middle Ages are far more fun. Though it does run into the minor problem that they aren't really taught in schools that much. My own GCSE and A level experiences encompassed: A history of medicine, some eighteenth and nineteenth century US history, a project on the architectural development of a local church (sixteenth century, so still not medieval), World War Two/the Weimar Republic/Nazi Germany, Eighteenth/Nineteenth century Europe. There seems to be an underlying assumption that anything further back can't be particularly relevant. Which is not only nonsense, but ignores the whole narrativist strand of historical theory completely.

7 comments:

Jodie said...

Just wanted to give some support to medieval history - I think 90% of my uni modules were medieval to 17th century. Huzzah for the Carolingians and such! Somehow I managed to avoid almost all modules on WWII throughout my education, although lots of WWI oh and we both had some medicine history and local buildings history thrown in there, but no Ireland conflict for you I see.

englishcoach said...

Congrats on the story! When you say freelancing, would that be freelance teaching or what? Sometimes it's helpful to go against the flow, at some time or other there's going to be a terrible lack of medievalists (what a dreadful thought). That might not happen for another ten years, but you'll be a successful writer by then, won't you.

stu said...

Karen, it would probably have to be freelance writing rather than teaching. The PhD doesn't encompass the PGCE, so other than a spot of tutoring, I wouldn't be qualified.

Jodie, I did do Ireland, after a fashion, though I just remember doing the coursework, not spending any time learning it. And the school promptly lost the coursework.

Heather said...

Congrats on the story acceptance!! I best you get a rush every single time.

englishcoach said...

OK, I'm guessing here; PGCE = Post Graduate Certificate of Education, is that correct? So does that mean that in order to teach at Uni in GB, they actually expect you to have done some teacher training? WOW!! I don't know if the news seeped through that students here in Deutschland are protesting, on strike in some places. Apart from money and inhuman course requirements, they also complain about the standard of teaching, and boyo can I feel for them. I've been to a few real seminars where we actually appear in person for this distance learning course I'm on, and frankly, depending on who's teaching, they can be a complete waste of time. Some profs obviously know their stuff, but are hopeless at getting a discussion going, or at guiding it to the place they want to be. Frustrating!

Stewart Sternberg said...

Congratulations on your short story acceptance. The short story market is slim and it's difficult to get a novel published in an environment where five corporations determine what has literary merit. The key, in my opinion, is to wedge in the door through a small press.

However, have you given consideration to freelancing non-fiction writing? It's my understanding that there is a good deal of money to be made. Or even in grant writing.

stu said...

Sorry, I got a little confused there. Actually, for university lecturing, it's just the PhD. It's just that when someone says teaching I automatically think of teaching kids. Temorary lecturing is certainly the usual way in for the universities.